I’ve been thinking…

… about what to contribute to the ongoing discussion of [Ken Wilber](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Wilber)’s [Wyatt Earp post](http://www.kenwilber.com/blog/show/46) and I was just reading [Tom’s](http://zenunbound.com/blogmandu.html) [post](http://zenunbound.com/2006/06/rattlesnake-post-was-not-test.html) about [his own feather-ruffling post on Zaadz](http://zenunbound.com/2006/05/is-zaadz-den-of-rattlesnakes.html) and a thought arose that I thought might be worth contributing.

In [the follow-up](http://www.kenwilber.com/blog/show/48) to a first post which offended and delighted people in various proportions, Wilber explains his use of provocation:

>So in your own responses, you can look to whether it was with compassion or idiot compassion, whether second-tier depth or first-tier flatland—what was your own response? How many perspectives can you include? It’s a simple challenge. A challenge to: what altitude are you, what are your own levels and lines, and most of all, what are your shadow elements? So, if I may respectfully suggest, look at your response to that first blog and ask yourself those questions.

Which some people have [tried to brand a cult loyalty test](http://blog.p2pfoundation.net/?p=245). But here’s what arose in me when pondering this:

*Every* blog post is a challenge to examine your cognitive development, your lines of development and most especially your Shadow. Every post we read, every post we write.

When we blog we are Mind reading and Heart writing and we are monkey-chattering.

That’s all.

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10 responses to “I’ve been thinking…

  1. I love it. This particular monkey needs to spend less time with the reading and writing and more time working.

  2. I love it. This particular monkey needs to spend less time with the reading and writing and more time working.

  3. Great observation, Tim. EVERY event in life is an opportunity to examine our reactivity and our shadows.

  4. Great observation, Tim. EVERY event in life is an opportunity to examine our reactivity and our shadows.

  5. Yes, but clearly Wilber wasn’t really asking us to judge ourselves. HE was judging US. That’s OK, but I very much agree with what I take from your post here that it was unnecessary.

    I think that from a nest of posts by any one blogger, you can get a vivid sense of that person. Whether it is necessary to label people on the color scale, I have my doubts. And whether it is kosher to use inauthenticity to go about understanding people, I have greater doubts.

    — Tom Armstrong, Blogmandu

  6. Yes, but clearly Wilber wasn’t really asking us to judge ourselves. HE was judging US. That’s OK, but I very much agree with what I take from your post here that it was unnecessary.

    I think that from a nest of posts by any one blogger, you can get a vivid sense of that person. Whether it is necessary to label people on the color scale, I have my doubts. And whether it is kosher to use inauthenticity to go about understanding people, I have greater doubts.

    — Tom Armstrong, Blogmandu

  7. I’ve not yet come to a firm opinion on this load of old Earp and may not. It’ll be contextualised by II’s future behaviour so ….

    My only current addition to the cacophony is that, after a short and probably not very representative survey of Visser’s site, I found that most posts there were either reading into KW’s stuff that which I didn’t think was there or attributing opinions to KW which I couldn’t see as being justified by any reasonably comprehensive reading of his stuff. Having limited time, I therefore go there rarely.

    I’d offer as a metric of the worth of that comment that I have similar problems reading criticisms of Dan Dennett. I very often cannot see how critics who hold that he denies the existence of (the experience of) consciousness get to that position from his writing.

    I do have a certain sympathy for whoever it was (Tom?) who thought KW might be catering to the sensibilities of the thirtysomethings with whom he is surrounded and have also found some of the posts by other folks that he quotes in his defence uncomfortably close to sycophancy.

    The present moment is a multi-perspectival unfolding of … of … something or other.

    Love to All
    Simon

  8. I’ve not yet come to a firm opinion on this load of old Earp and may not. It’ll be contextualised by II’s future behaviour so ….

    My only current addition to the cacophony is that, after a short and probably not very representative survey of Visser’s site, I found that most posts there were either reading into KW’s stuff that which I didn’t think was there or attributing opinions to KW which I couldn’t see as being justified by any reasonably comprehensive reading of his stuff. Having limited time, I therefore go there rarely.

    I’d offer as a metric of the worth of that comment that I have similar problems reading criticisms of Dan Dennett. I very often cannot see how critics who hold that he denies the existence of (the experience of) consciousness get to that position from his writing.

    I do have a certain sympathy for whoever it was (Tom?) who thought KW might be catering to the sensibilities of the thirtysomethings with whom he is surrounded and have also found some of the posts by other folks that he quotes in his defence uncomfortably close to sycophancy.

    The present moment is a multi-perspectival unfolding of … of … something or other.

    Love to All
    Simon

  9. The Master of the Temple asks, on seeing a slug:
    “What is the purpose of this message from the Unseen?”
    — Crowley, A. (1929) Liber ABA.

  10. The Master of the Temple asks, on seeing a slug:
    “What is the purpose of this message from the Unseen?”
    — Crowley, A. (1929) Liber ABA.

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